Your Argument Is Invalid

Random blatherings about life, the universe and everything.

12,974 notes

bogleech:

Hey, how come we never talk about Charles Addams?

I barely ever see compilations of his work for sale.

I barely ever see his cartoons being blogged.

His tumblr tag is sparse as hell.

So many people have no idea that the Addams Family began as recurring characters in what was basically "The Far Side" of the 1940’s and 50’s.

He invented the Addams Family and he barely gets any credit. People today think they started with the TV series, or worse, they think they started in a series of films they falsely attribute to Tim Burton.

And seventy years later his jokes feel as fresh and sharp as ever. Some are just funnier and funnier the more you let them sink in.

That patent attourney immediately tried the death ray.

Filed under charles addams cartoons

304 notes

alexicography:

illustratedjai:

alexicography:

ironychan:

YOU GUYS.

THE LATIN VERB ‘FINGO’ MEANS ‘TO TOUCH’.

THAT’S WHY WE CALL THEM ‘FINGERS’.

THEY FING.

To shape/fashion/form, but yes.

FINGERS ACTUALLY FING???
why did no one tell me this sooner????

i am so pleased by this information. 

(wait wait why does GERMAN use finger but french uses doigt, tho, if it’s a latin verrrbbbb?????)

Doigt comes from the Latin digitus, which in turn is from PIE ‘deyg-‘, to show, point out. Therefore, a finger is a pointer, or a thing used to count (digit).

My guess would be that the Anglo-Saxon viewed their fingers as tools of labour — they shaped things, they fashioned things, they worked with their hands. The Norman nobility, on the other hand, had fingers for pointing at things, for counting, for doing things that someone with an education and someone who is above such menial tasks as building would be doing.

Filed under sounds legit words

8,458 notes

cross-connect:

NeSpoon is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland. Her artistic focus is on the intricate patterns of lace, and breaking its granny stereotype by using it to beautify gritty urban spaces. NeSpoon calls her artistic approach the “jewellery of the public space”:

Jewellery makes people look pretty, my public jewellery has the same goal, make public places look better.

NeSpoon often uses the usual spray paint and stencils of enlarged lace patterns to produce her works on the street via

artist find at Lustik

(via goodstuffhappenedtoday)

Filed under graffiti