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Random blatherings about life, the universe and everything.

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starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Braided Rapunzels of Africa

The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.
The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.

(Source: messynessychic.com, via scienceyoucanlove)

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usnatarchives:

Meet Mary Tippee, or Mary Tebe, a vivandere with the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, whose unit was led by Collis Zouaves. Women in this position were responsible for working in canteens and carrying water, brandy, or wine for the soldiers. In traditional vivandere fashion, Tippee is pictured wearing the uniform of her company, with a knee-length skirt over the men’s pants. Ca. 1863. Attributed to Charles J. and Isaac G. Tyson. Tipton Collection. National Archives Identifier: 520205

usnatarchives:

Meet Mary Tippee, or Mary Tebe, a vivandere with the 114th Pennsylvania Infantry, whose unit was led by Collis Zouaves. Women in this position were responsible for working in canteens and carrying water, brandy, or wine for the soldiers. In traditional vivandere fashion, Tippee is pictured wearing the uniform of her company, with a knee-length skirt over the men’s pants. Ca. 1863. Attributed to Charles J. and Isaac G. Tyson. Tipton Collection. National Archives Identifier: 520205

Filed under women history military

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In the post-World War II era, the Klan experienced a huge resurgence. Its membership was skyrocketing, and its political influence was increasing, so Kennedy went undercover to infiltrate the group. By regularly attending meetings, he became privy to the organization’s secrets. But when he took the information to local authorities, they had little interest in using it. The Klan had become so powerful and intimidating that police were hesitant to build a case against them.

Struggling to make use of his findings, Kennedy approached the writers of the Superman radio serial. It was perfect timing. With the war over and the Nazis no longer a threat, the producers were looking for a new villain for Superman to fight. The KKK was a great fit for the role.

In a 16-episode series titled “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” the writers pitted the Man of Steel against the men in white hoods. As the storyline progressed, the shows exposed many of the KKK’s most guarded secrets. By revealing everything from code words to rituals, the program completely stripped the Klan of its mystique. Within two weeks of the broadcast, KKK recruitment was down to zero. And by 1948, people were showing up to Klan rallies just to mock them.

How Superman Defeated the Ku Klux Klan | Mental Floss (via sarkos)

(via historicallyaccuratesteve)

Filed under kkk ku klux klan superman