Your Argument Is Invalid

Random blatherings about life, the universe and everything.

2,377 notes

When alien life entered our world, it was from deep beneath the Pacific Ocean. A fissure between two tectonic plates. A portal between dimensions. The Breach. I was fifteen when the first Kaiju made land in San Francisco.

(Source: captainsteves)

Filed under pacific rim colors

259,009 notes

thecityhorse:

adriofthedead:

swearbythefrecklesonthemoon:

chekhovs:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.
It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!
Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]
Go to the website HERE.

It’s just a click… takes about 1 or 2 seconds.

there’s no pop-up ads or anything on the site
just click it once and you’re done

if all of my followers click, it’s more than a few thousand meals so.. please?

thecityhorse:

adriofthedead:

swearbythefrecklesonthemoon:

chekhovs:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.

It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!

Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]

Go to the website HERE.

It’s just a click… takes about 1 or 2 seconds.

there’s no pop-up ads or anything on the site

just click it once and you’re done

if all of my followers click, it’s more than a few thousand meals so.. please?

(Source: hamandheroin, via plaiddingsbyplaidofplaidness)

34 notes

hclib:

fiveoclockbot:

On my run today around the Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis, I came across this sign on the bluffs above the old Bohemian Flats. Lost Twin Cities. An old road, crossing a forgotten field of weeds, sandwiched under bridges and overpasses. Wonder where it would have taken you. 

Here is a link to the 1914 Map of Minneapolis.  Check plate 33 - Bluff Street in in the upper left hand corner, below the Mississippi.

hclib:

fiveoclockbot:

On my run today around the Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis, I came across this sign on the bluffs above the old Bohemian Flats. Lost Twin Cities. An old road, crossing a forgotten field of weeds, sandwiched under bridges and overpasses. Wonder where it would have taken you. 

Here is a link to the 1914 Map of Minneapolis.  Check plate 33 - Bluff Street in in the upper left hand corner, below the Mississippi.

Filed under minneapolis

686 notes

erikkwakkel:

Medieval dachshund - Or: drawing with words

Here are three examples of a technique called “micrography”: decorative scenes that are drawn with words written in a tiny script. While there are examples from Latin books made in the West (here is one), the technique is particularly common in medieval Hebrew manuscripts. The drawings are usually found in biblical manuscripts and they appear to be commentaries to the text. The technique, whereby a scribe wrote in the smallest handwriting possible, goes back to the 9th century AD. The examples here, from the 13th century, shows just how entertaining the word-made drawings can be: they are an opportunity for the scribe to frolick in the margins of the page - like drawing a creature that looks like a dachshund.

Pic: London, British Library, Additional MS 21160 (13th century, more about the manuscript here). More about micrography here.

Filed under manuscripts