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Posts tagged wonderful women

300,406 notes

broadlybrazen:

mater-tenebrarum:

fuzzyhorns:

pushtheheart:

missingkeys:

calystarose:

Girl is pioneer at quarterback for Florida High School

That first picture just fills me with such joy and a feeling of hope.

HEY ERIN HEY!

It’s the last picture that gets me. Her eyes are off reading the defense, because she’s not handing off to the RB, that’s a fake. She’s the QB and she’d doing her goddamn job and she’s doing it well. GET IT GIRL.

“Everybody says, ‘What happens when she gets hit?’ ” Gatewood said. “This isn’t a knock on Erin, but she’s bigger than 10 kids on my team. I have a wide receiver that weighs 25 pounds less than her. And the pads she wears are the same as the pads he wears.”

This is the only context in which football matters to me

GET IT GIRL

hahaha omg i thought this to myself too

Seriously, the thing that the coach said. 

The media has really fucked with our perceptions of women’s bodies. Women, generally speaking, are way heavier than you think compared to men of comparable height.

i love everything about this photoset, but i especially adore the first pic, with her cheerleader friend helping her tie back her hair. just…y’know, cheerleading is so strongly linked to a particular embodiment of femininity, just as playing football is strongly linked to a particular embodiment of masculinity, and like. girls are always pitted against each other, man, and their different ways of being girls are always pitted against each other. 

to me, that first pic overturns a lot of shitty narratives about girlhood and girl friendships in one cute snapshot of a fleeting moment between two friends. idk, i just really love it.

(via yourownworstcritic)

Filed under reblogging because I can gender roles football wonderful women

87,023 notes

Nancy Wake, who has died in London just before her 99th birthday, was a New Zealander brought up in Australia. She became a nurse, a journalist who interviewed Adolf Hitler, a wealthy French socialite, a British agent and a French resistance leader. She led 7,000 guerrilla fighters in battles against the Nazis in the northern Auvergne, just before the D-Day landings in 1944. On one occasion, she strangled an SS sentry with her bare hands. On another, she cycled 500 miles to replace lost codes. In June 1944, she led her fighters in an attack on the Gestapo headquarters at Montlucon in central France.

Ms Wake was furious the TV series [later made about her life] suggested she had had a love affair with one of her fellow fighters. She was too busy killing Nazis for amorous entanglements, she said.

Nancy recalled later in life that her parachute had snagged in a tree. The French resistance fighter who freed her said he wished all trees bore “such beautiful fruit.” Nancy retorted: “Don’t give me that French shit.”

"Resistance heroine who led 7,000 men against the Nazis," The Independent. (via madelinecoleman)

(via pyrrhiccomedy)

Filed under reblogging because I can history women kickass women FTW! cool chicks from history wonderful women

18,196 notes

ihaveanarmy-wehaveatimelord:

bellonanj73:

robot-heart-politics:

asweetlittlebaby:

intermodal:

In America, this would have earned her a horrible reputation, probably cost her her career with the police force, and would have been a controversy that would have somehow “shocked” the media and therefore the public.  Instead, she was declared a hero, and now holds a high position in her field.  Well done, China!
From Police Officer Breastfed Quake Babies on I Am Not the Babysitter:

Twenty-nine year old police officer, Jiang Xiaojuan, left her six month old baby with her mother to take part in disaster relief efforts, after the 2008 earthquake.
Xiaojaun breastfed nine babies during her relief work and was nicknamed “The police mom”.
Since then she was appointed to the Communist Party of China Committee of the Jiangyou Public Security Bureau and is now the bureau’s vice commissar. This was after she was awarded the titles of “hero and model police officer” and “excellent member of the communist party” – all for her breastfeeding efforts in the field.

What did Jiang Xiaojuan have to say about it?  Well, according to the CNN article,





“I think what I did was normal,” she said. “In a quake zone, many people do things for others. This was a small thing, not worth mentioning.”

Also:

“I feel about these kids I fed just like my own. I have a special feeling for them. They are babies in a disaster.”






THE FEEEEEEEEEEEEELZZZZZZZZ

She fed up to nine babies, and she’s still feeding two children whose mothers lost their milk during the events of the quake because of the stress. What an incredible lady.

<salutes>

This lady is a hero. 

ihaveanarmy-wehaveatimelord:

bellonanj73:

robot-heart-politics:

asweetlittlebaby:

intermodal:

In America, this would have earned her a horrible reputation, probably cost her her career with the police force, and would have been a controversy that would have somehow “shocked” the media and therefore the public.  Instead, she was declared a hero, and now holds a high position in her field.  Well done, China!

From Police Officer Breastfed Quake Babies on I Am Not the Babysitter:

Twenty-nine year old police officer, Jiang Xiaojuan, left her six month old baby with her mother to take part in disaster relief efforts, after the 2008 earthquake.

Xiaojaun breastfed nine babies during her relief work and was nicknamed “The police mom”.

Since then she was appointed to the Communist Party of China Committee of the Jiangyou Public Security Bureau and is now the bureau’s vice commissar. This was after she was awarded the titles of “hero and model police officer” and “excellent member of the communist party” – all for her breastfeeding efforts in the field.

What did Jiang Xiaojuan have to say about it?  Well, according to the CNN article,

“I think what I did was normal,” she said. “In a quake zone, many people do things for others. This was a small thing, not worth mentioning.”

Also:

“I feel about these kids I fed just like my own. I have a special feeling for them. They are babies in a disaster.”

THE FEEEEEEEEEEEEELZZZZZZZZ

She fed up to nine babies, and she’s still feeding two children whose mothers lost their milk during the events of the quake because of the stress. What an incredible lady.

<salutes>

This lady is a hero. 

(via womenwhokickass)

Filed under wonderful women women

33,401 notes

anomalousdata:

tinyphalanges:

bemusedlybespectacled:

blueboxonbakerstreet:

“Julie D’Aubigny was a 17th-century bisexual French opera singer and fencing master who killed or wounded at least ten men in life-or-death duels, performed nightly shows on the biggest and most highly-respected opera stage in the world, and once took the Holy Orders just so that she could sneak into a convent and bang a nun. If nothing in that sentence at least marginally interests you, I have no idea why you’re visiting this website.”

NEVER HAS THIS GIF BEEN MORE APPROPRIATE.

PRETTY LADY ACQURE TIME TRAVEL IMMEDIATELY

“FIRST I WILL STAB THIS DUDE. THEN I WILL SING ABOUT IT.”

Filed under Julie D’Aubigny history women flawless wonderful women

5,588 notes

lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 
Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.
Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.
Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”
Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.
Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”
Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”
Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.
Image (via World War II Database)
Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

lostsplendor:

Hazel Lee [1912-1944] 

Experienced women pilots, like Lee, were eager to join the WASP, and responded to interview requests by Cochran. Members of the WASP reported to Avenger Field, in wind swept Sweetwater, Texas for an arduous 6-month training program. Lee was accepted into the 4th class, 43 W 4.[2] Hazel Ying Lee was the first Chinese American woman to fly for the United States military.

Although flying under military command, the women pilots of the WASP were classified as civilians. They were paid through the civil service. No military benefits were offered. Even if killed in the line of duty, no military funerals were allowed. The WASPs were often assigned the least desirable missions, such as winter trips in open cockpit airplanes. Commanding officers were reluctant to give women any flying deliveries. It took an order from the head of the Air Transport Command to improve the situation.

Upon graduation, Lee was assigned to the third Ferrying Group at Romulus, Michigan. Their assignment was critical to the war effort; Deliver aircraft, pouring out of converted automobile factories, to points of embarkation, where they would then be shipped to the European and Pacific War fronts. In a letter to her sister, Lee described Romulus as “a 7-day workweek, with little time off.” When asked to describe Lee’s attitude, a fellow member of the WASP summed it up in Lee’s own words, “I’ll take and deliver anything.”

Described by her fellow pilots as “calm and fearless,” Lee had two forced landings. One landing took place in a Kansas wheat field. A farmer, pitchfork in hand, chased her around the plane while shouting to his neighbors that the Japanese had invaded Kansas. Alternately running and ducking under her wing, Lee finally stood her ground. She told the farmer who she was and demanded that he put the pitchfork down. He complied.

Lee was a favorite with just about all of her fellow pilots. She had a great sense of humor and a marvelous sense of mischief. Lee used her lipstick to inscribe Chinese characters on the tail of her plane and the planes of her fellow pilots. One lucky fellow who happened to be a bit on the chubby side, had his plane dubbed (unknown to him) “Fat Ass.”

Lee was in demand when a mission was RON (Remaining Overnight) In a big city or in a small country town, she could always find a Chinese restaurant, supervise the menu, and often cook the food herself. She was a great cook. Fellow WASP pilot Sylvia Dahmes Clayton observed that “Hazel provided me with an opportunity to learn about a different culture at a time when I did not know anything else. She expanded my world and my outlook on life.”

Lee and the others were the first women to pilot fighter aircraft for the United States military.

Image (via World War II Database)

Text [click for full article] (via Wikipedia)

(via lostsplendor)

Filed under that's history damn it history women wonderful women